Thamesmead resident Claudette Lawrence petitions government to improve assessment procedures for people with mental health issues

Claudette Lawrence has been campaigning for years to support people with mental health issues. The Thamesmead resident suffers from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. She was invited to No.10 Downing Street to advise ex-Prime Minister Gordon Brown and was consulted by Ed Miliband during his time as Labour leader. She has started a petition that has around 70,000 signatures calling on the Government to improve their assessment procedures for benefits.

My name is Claudette. I am 49 and I am disabled. I have chronic health conditions and I have been ill most of my adult life.

Claudette Lawrence

When I tell people I am disabled, if they do not know me and have not met me, they assume I must be in a wheelchair.

Most of the conditions that I suffer from are invisible, which means they cannot be seen, and because of this I have faced a lot of prejudice and discrimination over the years.

When I tell people that I am disabled some look at me and say, ‘well what is wrong with you?’

My condition fluctuates. Some days I cannot get out of bed and spend a lot of time sleeping, some days I cannot wash or shower as it involves too much mental or physical energy.

Like today I am writing this article in bed. Sometimes my mood is really low and I feel really depressed and am unable to do anything.

My illness has robbed me of my career. I have had to give up three good jobs because I was not well enough to hold a job down.

I have been to university, studied law, and had some really rewarding careers such as managing a women’s refuge and working for Transport for London (TfL).

Some days I feel very upset about being ill, and think why me, but then I think there is always someone worse off.

People are misinformed when it comes to what a disability is or what being disabled is. As already explained, they assume that you must be in a wheelchair, in fact, only recently someone said that to me.

I explained that having a disability does not mean that you have to be in a wheelchair.

A disability, for the purpose of the Equality Act 2010, is “a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities”.

“Substantial and long-term” means more than trivial and long-term means 12 months or more.

Progressive means it gets worse over time, eg, someone may have chronic epilepsy and is unable to work because of how it affects them and another person may have the same condition but be able to work.

I think it is really important not to let your disability define you.

Another thing I find annoying is people assume you should not look after yourself so if you wear makeup you must be OK.

Try to look at the positives. Never give up.

13 thoughts on “Thamesmead resident Claudette Lawrence petitions government to improve assessment procedures for people with mental health issues

  • 23rd November 2018 at 8:57 pm
    Permalink

    Very well written. Hope to read more.

    Reply
    • 24th November 2018 at 4:27 pm
      Permalink

      Claudette is an inspiration to all, especially those who have a disability.
      I have the great pleasure of being a friend of Claudette.

      Reply
  • 24th November 2018 at 4:17 pm
    Permalink

    Inspiring story and vitally important that those with “invisible illnesses” such as ME are taken seriously and their needs are properly addressed.

    Reply
  • 24th November 2018 at 4:18 pm
    Permalink

    Although Claudette has these disabilities she is a fighter for rights for all disabled people.

    Reply
  • 24th November 2018 at 4:24 pm
    Permalink

    Very good point, it just shows how misinformed some people are, keep on campaigning

    Reply
  • 24th November 2018 at 4:24 pm
    Permalink

    I echo everything Claudette has said and living with chronic illness and dissability for many years myself i am so supportive of Claudettes campaign Hats off to her for taking on the plight of the dissabled .

    Reply
  • 24th November 2018 at 4:44 pm
    Permalink

    I think Claudette, has done a marvellous job in raising awareness in this campaign. In fact I know her own health, is a battle alone.
    Her kind a generous nature, seems to be putting people first before her own circumstances.
    I’m lucky to have known Claudette, for some considerable years.
    It’s not nice to see someone struggling with health problems.
    Especially when their health is declining. Over the years Claudette’s health has got worse.
    I hope people are grateful for her help, even though she struggles, herself. One day it could be you with poor health, it’s thanks to people like Claudette, that has helped pave the way for people suffering.
    Big thanks to Claudette.

    Reply
  • 24th November 2018 at 4:49 pm
    Permalink

    This is great, raising more awareness about invisible injuries.

    Reply
  • 24th November 2018 at 5:01 pm
    Permalink

    A worthy cause, Keep on fighting Claudette.

    Reply
  • 24th November 2018 at 6:02 pm
    Permalink

    Very brave woman to stand up for others with mental health issues

    Reply
  • 25th November 2018 at 8:17 am
    Permalink

    A very truthful & accurate description of someone who constantly suffers with MH disability, generally it is so misunderstood and the help that should be forthcoming is more often that not unavailable due to the shocking state of the MH system, well done for highlighting this Claudette Dorey

    Reply
  • 28th November 2018 at 9:38 pm
    Permalink

    Well done Claudette, I am proud of you

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *