Croydon council bids to build 600 new homes on 20 plots of land

By Tara O’Connor, Local Democracy Correspondent

Croydon council wants to submit planning applications to create 600 new homes on 20 plots of its land through its own building firm, Brick by Brick.

But many local people aren’t happy about it.

A spokesman for Brick by Brick said: “We work closely with the local community and other stakeholders on all our proposed developments, consulting extensively throughout the process in many different ways.

“This is central to our mission to create well-designed homes that are properly integrated with the surrounding neighbourhoods, and ensuring the homes we create are prioritised for local people.

“Working with the community is at the heart of everything we do, and all proceeds from our developments are returned to the council to be reinvested in Croydon.”

The developments are:

  • King Henry’s Drive, New Addington – a four-storey block of 27 flats. There will be some green space not built on and residents are being asked for their ideas on what could go here
  • Gascgoine Road, New Addington- a six-storey block of 23 flats. On the same site there is already a five-storey block of flats
  • Fairchilds Avenue, New Addington – two patches of land, one next to the junction with Comport Green, the other on the corner of Fairfields Avenue and King Henry’s Drive. No plans published yet
  • Corbett Close, New Addington – land behind the homes on the corner of Corbett Close bordering Fairchilds Avenue
  • Windham Avenue, New Addington – a three-storey building of nine flats, and five two-storey houses. Garages in Windham Avenue would be demolished
  • Thorpe Close, New Addington – two separate developments on garage sites. No details yet
  • Redstart Close, New Addington – on garages and green space in Redstart Close. No details yet
  • Milne Park East, New Addington – garages earmarked for redevelopment
  • Merrow Way, New Addington –  garages would be demolished for a three-storey building of 12 one and two-bedroom flats
  • Headley Drive, New Addington – two new buildings of 30 new flats
  • Duppas Hill Terrace, Croydon old town – an area of green space and homes, including Cromwell House and Duppas Court
  • Dunsfold Way, New Addington – 13 new homes
  • Castle Hill Avenue, New Addington – a three-storey block of six flats with three parking spaces
  • Bramley Hill, Waddon – two sites between 9 Bramley Hill, Albury Court and 18 Bramley Hill for three to six-storey block of one and two-bed flats, as well as three-bedroom houses near Dering Road and 9 Bramley Hill. Another proposal for 39 flats and houses near Albury Court in two blocks and a pair of semi-detached houses
  • Arnhem Drive, New Addington – currently a green verge and a car park but residents are being asked for feedback on what they would like to see
  • Alford Green, New Addington – one plan is a terrace of six two-bedroom houses, each with a terrace at the first floor and private garden; a second is a three storey block of six one-bedroom flats; and a third is three-four storey building of nine flats
  • Holmesdale Road, Selhurst – three separate blocks of flats providing 80 new homes on garage sites and other ‘pockets of space’
  • Hawthorn Crescent, Selsdon – nine three-bedroom terraced houses between Hawthorn Crescent and Old Farleigh Road
  • Covington Way, Norbury – a green space bordering Covington Way and Crescent Way would be redeveloped to provide nine one and two-bed flats. Residents living nearby have started a petition against this and say they use the green space for community events.
  • Atlanta Court, Thornton Heath – garages and washing line area at the back of Atlanta Court in Parchmore Road could have 23 new flats in a three to four-storey building.

One thought on “Croydon council bids to build 600 new homes on 20 plots of land

  • 12th February 2020 at 5:07 pm
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    This madness is going on all over Croydon. 600 houses in 20 plots is insane!

    Just as Croydon moves away from having a bad name this happens. I’m sure in years to come people will ask the question how was this allowed.

    Reply

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